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Trump

AnthroCurrents January 31, 2017

The last week and a half have been pretty intense.  I hope you can find a brief respite in hearing about the good work of our fellow colleagues.

I cannot wait to see the results of the Human Generosity Project. In such divided times, I can think of no better question than under what conditions do people cooperate and share with each other?  Will disasters or risks bring people together or drive them apart?

Anthropologists are engaging in the current political dialogue in some important and thoughtful ways. I’m extremely proud to stand with the AAA call… Continue reading

AnthroCurrents — November 15, 2016

Politics, Domestic and Foreign
Paul Stoller (West Chester U.) argues for ethnography as one of the weapons available to those fighting against the anti-progressive movement represented by Donald Trump’s election.

Journalists use an anthropological lens in a documentary film of the Trump Tribe, and attempt to understand the beliefs and motivations of Trump supporters during the US presidential election season.

As reported in the Sao Paulo press, John Comaroff (Harvard U.) provides consulting services to Brazil’s former president Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, who is being prosecuted for corruption.

Podcasts
Recently stumbled across this one and will have to… Continue reading

AnthroCurrents — August 9, 2016

Thank you to Mella Baker for reminding us that not all anthropologist heroes are white and male. Welcome to anthropology! I haven’t looked at the demographics of our field recently, but I assume we still have a ways to go before the American profession better reflects the general population.

Screen capture of Tweet by Mella Baker. 8 August 2016

Screen capture of Tweet by Mella Baker. 8 August 2016

 

American Presidential Politics

Our last post looked at possible anthropological explanations for the popularity of Donald J. Trump, Republican presidential nominee. Reader Carie Little Hersh, Northeastern U., points us to an article by Tanya Luhrmann, Stanford U., reflecting on… Continue reading

AnthroCurrents – July 26, 2016

American Presidential Politics

Earlier this month Brexit was THE topic in the American media. NOW it is presidential politics. How would anthropologists explain the popularity of Donald Trump? There are several possibilities:

  • An historian offers Emile Durkheim‘s “collective efferevescence,” but that seems a bit one-dimensional.
  • A religious studies professor argues that anthropologist James Frazer‘s discussion of magicians and kings in The Golden Bough is a better explanation. But aren’t there some living anthropologists we can consult?
  • Linguist George Lakoff (UC Berkeley) comes close. His most recent piece in The Huffington Post summarizes previous observations about American world… Continue reading