r_10 r_5 r_5

no images were found

AnthroCurrents

AnthroCurrents–November 29, 2016

Practicing Anthropology
The Wall Street Journal gives passing mention to ethnography as a marketing research tool, in an article about how election polling that missed Middle America’s votes for Trump may indicate similar advertising research has similar limitations. Seeking Alpha goes further, proclaiming that “[e]thnography is probably the only way to gather accurate data” for marketing and advertising.

The Evansville Courier & Press profiles doula and medical anthropologist Hillary Melichors (The Doula Group of Evansville).

The designers of SafariSeat, an all-terrain wheelchair to aid mobility in developing countries used ethnography as one component of a multi-disciplinary… Continue reading

AnthroCurrents — November 15, 2016

Politics, Domestic and Foreign
Paul Stoller (West Chester U.) argues for ethnography as one of the weapons available to those fighting against the anti-progressive movement represented by Donald Trump’s election.

Journalists use an anthropological lens in a documentary film of the Trump Tribe, and attempt to understand the beliefs and motivations of Trump supporters during the US presidential election season.

As reported in the Sao Paulo press, John Comaroff (Harvard U.) provides consulting services to Brazil’s former president Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva, who is being prosecuted for corruption.

Podcasts
Recently stumbled across this one and will have to… Continue reading

AnthroCurrents – November 1, 2016

Trick or Treat?
Anthropologists Discover Isolated Tribe Of Joyful Americans Living In Remote Village Untouched By 2016 Election. From The Onion.

Sam Migliore (Kwantlen Polytechnic U.) is interviewed by the local newspaper in Surrey, British Columbia, Canada about an ethnography of zombies. Yes, he knows a few.

Phillips Stevens, Jr. (U. of Buffalo) is interviewed by WBFO Radio about how the “curse” on the Chicago Cubs—up to the current World Series in American baseball—has truly been a case of magical thinking.

Applied Ethnography
A pharmaceutical magazine’s online outlet posts a video from a market research agency… Continue reading

AnthroCurrents — October 18, 2016

Anthropologist Bloggers Wanted
Fellow anthropologist bloggers (and aspiring bloggers), note two opportunities to expand your reach:

Anthropology News is looking for columnists to address “hot topics” in the news. Send a 300-word pitch by October 21st.

The Guardian is expanding the scope of their science blog network to include archaeology and anthropology. Proposals, or nominations of colleagues, from any sub-discipline are welcome.

Haiti is not Deforested
Apparently, as regular as the Atlantic hurricane season, including recent Hurricane Matthew, is the media’s description of a “deforested” Haiti. Anthropologists Gerald F. Murray (U. of Florida, Emeritus), Andrew Tarter (U. of… Continue reading

AnthroCurrents – October 4, 2016

A roundup of Anthropology in the News for September 2016.

On the National Scene
Anthropologists and the American Anthropological Association are among those opposing the Dakota Access Pipeline.

CNN continues to offer its version of “political anthropology” of the US election season, this time on Long Island. Still no anthropologists in sight.

The Army War College cemetery in Carlisle, PA, contains the remains of native Alaskans. And while there is a story there, the recent chapter involves the controversy of repatriation.

Discussion of how kuru spread among the Fore of Papua New Guinea is not just a… Continue reading

AnthroCurrents–September 20, 2016

What are some of the other websites and blogs that track anthropology-in-the-news and practicing anthropology? Here are some “highly cited” places on the web to follow. All of the sites and blogs below may be followed on Twitter, some on Facebook or other social media, and some offer weekly email subscriptions. While you are at it, follow us on Twitter (@NapaAnthro) Facebook (@NAPA.Anthro), or LinkedIn (National Association for the Practice of Anthropology).

A classic example of an anthropology-news-tracking blog is www.anthropologyworks.com – a weekly blog from the Culture in Global Affairs (CIGA) research and policy program at George… Continue reading

AnthroCurrents–September 6, 2016

Welcome back to the academy, students and faculty! As we watch Labor Day in the rearview mirror, the northern hemisphere’s colleges and universities are all in full operation. Our “back to school special” is a list of all the subfields of, or application of, cultural “anthropology” that we found published during the month of August (without duplicating our posts on August 9th and August 23rd). We hope these provide inspiration for research papers, lecture anecdotes, and career choices. Enjoy!

Ethnography is growing as a market research tool in corporations and women in corporations find corporate anthropology to… Continue reading

AnthroCurrents — August 23, 2016

The Olympics just ended, the American presidential election campaigns are in full swing, and academic anthropologists are returning to the classroom after summer travel and research. But today let’s focus on how practicing anthropologists are raising the profile of our discipline in the business and corporate world.

Maia Green (U. of Manchester) reviews The Silo Effect: Why Every Organisation Needs to Disrupt Itself to Survive by Gillian Tett (Financial Times). The book, among other things, explains how the outside observer perspective of anthropologists is a critical tool for corporate change.

Meanwhile, business and marketing consultants are realizing—and writing about—how an… Continue reading

AnthroCurrents — August 9, 2016

Thank you to Mella Baker for reminding us that not all anthropologist heroes are white and male. Welcome to anthropology! I haven’t looked at the demographics of our field recently, but I assume we still have a ways to go before the American profession better reflects the general population.

Screen capture of Tweet by Mella Baker. 8 August 2016

Screen capture of Tweet by Mella Baker. 8 August 2016

 

American Presidential Politics

Our last post looked at possible anthropological explanations for the popularity of Donald J. Trump, Republican presidential nominee. Reader Carie Little Hersh, Northeastern U., points us to an article by Tanya Luhrmann, Stanford U., reflecting on… Continue reading

AnthroCurrents – July 26, 2016

American Presidential Politics

Earlier this month Brexit was THE topic in the American media. NOW it is presidential politics. How would anthropologists explain the popularity of Donald Trump? There are several possibilities:

  • An historian offers Emile Durkheim‘s “collective efferevescence,” but that seems a bit one-dimensional.
  • A religious studies professor argues that anthropologist James Frazer‘s discussion of magicians and kings in The Golden Bough is a better explanation. But aren’t there some living anthropologists we can consult?
  • Linguist George Lakoff (UC Berkeley) comes close. His most recent piece in The Huffington Post summarizes previous observations about American world… Continue reading